Could your child tell the difference between an apple and a mango?

Could your child tell the difference between an apple and a mango?


Posted 14th September


Research conducted by Panasonic saw over 1,000 children, aged between four and 12 years old, polled, and has revealed the popularity of pre-prepared fresh food, coupled with time-poor parents is causing resulting in the next generation's failed ability to recognise basic produce, such as apples

For instance, 30 per cent of British children confused apples with mangos, while 20 per cent were unable to identify a raspberry, even though a quarter had eaten one within the last seven days.

It was easier for children to identify vegetables which would be bought whole, such as an avocado (75 per cent), or an aubergine (63 per cent) than pre-prepared produce, such as a mango (57 per cent). Children also found it easiest to identify vegetables that are popular emojis, such as the avocado and aubergine.

Daniel O’Shaughnessy, The Naked Nutritionist commented: "Fresh produce is such an important part of a child’s diet as it really does help aid development both physically and mentally throughout the initial stages of life as well as benefitting the quality of their lifestyle in many ways. Even though modern food trends have enabled many kids to eat more adventurous ingredients compared with the generation before. The avocado for example has experienced a huge resurgence enabling over three quarters (76%) of 4-12-year olds being able to identify this vegetable easily. However, there is still a lack of understanding over some of the simplest ingredients. Therefore, it is so important as a parent to encourage the family to get involved at home when it comes to cooking and eating fresh meals as often as you can, so that when you need to feed the little-one’s pre-prepared mango on the go for instance, they still know what it looks like fresh."

The research highlighted that in today's world, British children are struggling to understand exactly where food comes from, with a staggering 20 per cent of kids not realising eggs will come from an animal, while more than one in ten (11 per cent) believe chocolate grows on trees.





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