What to do with fallen leaves

What to do with fallen leaves


Posted 13th October


What do we do with those pesky fallen leaves?

From now until early November, the leaves are changing colour and falling, adding some autumnal dusting to the garden.

While a few leaves in the garden don't cause any problems, that can swiftly change, when they become hazardous, slippery wet leaves. Blocked drains and gutters can also cause a real headache for homeowners.

This has prompted Flymo to share their handy tips to help put the fallen leaves to good use.

Help your lawn

You can use the leaves that fall onto your lawn by setting a rotary lawnmower on its highest cutting height and mowing over them. This shreds the leaves into small pieces, allowing you to break them down into the lawn. This acts as a great soil conditioner and helps the soil to retain moisture and remain healthy throughout the winter.

Make compost

Fallen autumn leaves are a great source of brown material for your compost bin. Ensuring they are moist but not wet, mixed with green material, and turned once a month allows oxygen to circulate. They'll eventually break down into a thick black compost - this will act as rocket fuel for your plants, flowers and lawn.

Leaf mulch

If there are a large number of fallen leaves, you should use them as mulch which is a great alternative to throwing them away. You should start by collecting them and shredding them by using a rotary mower than is able to collect even wet leaves and shred them at the same time. Once you have shredded the leaves, place them around your plants and flower beds, some two or three inches thick avoiding the stem.

Leaf mulch has a number of benefits, which not only breaks down to become a great soil conditioner, but it acts as insulation for plants and vegetables, which will protect useful animals such as worms. It will also act as a useful weed barrier, helping to prevent them from growing.

Bag Them

During the spring and summer months, it will be hard to find sufficient brown materials for your compost bin. By storing them in bags in a cool, dry place, you'll have a rich source of brown material for the following year.

Insulation

It's worth collecting as many leaves as possible, drying them out, and then bagging them up. Pack as many as you can tightly together and store them in cold areas around the home, including the garden shed. These bags of leaves act like insulation, ensuring you keep the space warm during winter.





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