Garden plant of the month: the Butterfly Bush

Garden plant of the month: the Butterfly Bush


Posted 4th Aug 2016


We've spoken to thejoyofplants.co.uk who fill us in on the merits of the Butterfly Bush, and explain why it is their garden plant of the month for August

Few plants attract butterflies like the Butterfly Bush. With long plumes of flowers in fabulous colours, it is a real treasure for any garden. The plant will also bloom until early autumn, ensuring that your garden retains its colour that little bit longer.

A fantastic display of colour on and around the plant

The Butterfly Bush or Buddleia is an eye-catching deciduous shrub that will flower between July and October. The range of Butterfly Bushes is extensive, coming in white, blue, pink and lilac, with the size of the flowers ranging from 10 to 30cm. The height can also vary, this time from 0.50cm to over four metres.

One thing that all varieties have in common is that - as the name suggests - they attract butterflies, who are drawn in by the flowers' honey fragrance. These bushes can be planted either in the soil or in pots and containers.

buddleia

Caring for the Butterfly Bush:

Butterfly Bushes can be kept healthy and beautiful with a few simple tips:

- Place the plant in the partial shade and also in the sunshine - the Butterfly Bush likes the heat.
- Make sure it is in a well-drained location, with moist soil and is watered regularly.
- Ensure that plants are given extra fertiliser in the spring to keep them flowering profusely for as long as possible.
- As soon as you identify wilted flowers, remove them. New flowers could form after three to four weeks, ensuring that the plant will look elegant for longer.
- A Butterfly Bush can be very hardy if it's pruned at the right time. However it it's pruned too early in winter, the branches can freeze.

Pruning tips

- It's important to cut back the Butterfly Bush. This will help to produce flowers, while remaining young and healthy. If the plant is not pruned it can deprive other plants of sunshine, as the branches can be quite chunky. To do this you should use good pruning shears or a wooden saw.
- The best time to prune is the end of February or the beginning of March. Pruning earlier can mean the branches freeze.
- Tall varieties should be cut back to knee height. The shorter varieties can be trimmed back even further - do not be afraid to prune too vigorously, as the plant will produce new shoots.

Information and images courtesy of thejoyofplants.co.uk

 





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