7 tips to cooking the ideal lamb joint

7 tips to cooking the ideal lamb joint


Posted 24th May 2017


How do you cook the ideal lamb joint? These tips from GourmetMeatClub will help...

1 Select the best cut

If you'd like a lean cut, you should opt for a leg of lamb. As a cut, it's best served pink and juicy in the middle yet crisp on the outside. If you'd prefer a slightly fattier cut, you should opt for a lamb shoulder. Full of rich and traditional flavours, this is ideal for slow roasting, giving a beautifully tender result.

2 The warm up

Before you start cooking, allow the lamb to come to room temperature by removing it from the fridge up to an hour earlier. This will allow the meat cook more evenly.

3 Enhance the flavour

To add simple flavour to lamb, you should rub the top of the cut with a small amount of salt and pepper. You should then make several small incisions to the meat, with a sharp knife and place a small sprig of rosemary and garlic clove into each incision. This will result in the lamb having a fresh, fragrant flavour while it's cooking.

4 The Cooking

Preheat the oven fully before you start to cook the meat. To guarantee the cooking time is correct, use the following guide:

- Leg (whole, half, boneless) cook at 180C/Gas Mark 4: Pink – 25 minutes per 500g, plus 25 minutes: Well done – 30 minutes per 500g, plus 30 minutes

- Shoulder (whole, half, boneless) cook at 170C/Gas Mark 3: 40 minutes per 500g, plus 40 minutes

- Rack – Seal the meat in a pan then cook at 190C/Gas Mark 5: - Medium – 15 minutes; Well done – 20 minutes

5 Baste whilst cooking

Whilst you're cooking, remove the lamb from the oven once or twice and drizzle the cooking juices over the top with a spoon or a turkey baster - this will make sure the meat stays tender and avoids drying out.

6 Knowing when the lamb is cooked

If you're cooking a slow roasted joint, such as a shoulder of lamb, you will know the meat is cooked through when the lamb starts to fall apart. If cooking a lamb cut that can be served pink or well done, you should use a meat thermometer to gauge the internal temperature - medium should be 60C, well done should be 70C.

7 Allow the lamb to rest

Once cooked, remove the lamb shoulder, rack or leg from the oven and allow it to rest for 20 minutes before carving. This will give the juices a chance to settle back into the meat, making the meat jucier and easier to carve up.

Tips courtesy of GourmetMeatClub.co.uk





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