Seven ways to grow an eco-friendly garden

Seven ways to grow an eco-friendly garden


Posted 21st Mar 2018


Having a beautiful garden will not only be a pleasure for you but will also help to create a thriving ecosystem and wildlife haven too

If you're not sure how you can create your own, the garden experts at GardenBuildingsDirect.co.uk have compiled a list of exactly how you can create a true eco-garden with environmental benefits.

A spokesperson for GardenBuildingsDirect.co.uk said: "Some people say that a garden is never truly your own – there are lots of other beings living there as well."

"There are so many environmental benefits to an eco-garden, and you’ll get the added pleasure of knowing you’re playing a part in helping many plants and animals who need the eco-system."

"Even if your garden is small and you can’t do everything on the list, things like composting and feeding birds will still make a difference."

1 Companion planting

A good place to start is to grow plants that will be mutually beneficial. Garlic and roses are a classic example - the pungent smell is known to repel pests that attack roses, while carrots and spring onions will be another good combination - each plant will have a smell that can repel the other's pests.

2 Inter-planting

If you're looking to maximise the space in your garden, inter-plant different crops that will work together with their growth cycles. The small, faster growing plants will go into the spaces between larger, slower growing plants. Simple combinations include radishes and carrots (radishes mature first, thinning the earth and making it better for root vegetables), and onions and cabbage (onions grow and mature, while the cabbage provides shade).

3 Composting

One of the best additions to an eco-garden is compost, as it combines nutrients and micro-organisms into the soil, and costs nothing when you use your kitchen scraps. Just make sure you don't use meat or fish leftovers - these attract pests and vermin.

4 Keep bees

Bees are crucial pollinators, with most plants relying upon them. You can make your garden a bee haven by not using pesticides, having water readily available and growing plants such as lavender, honeysuckle and foxgloves. If you find a bee that is struggling on the ground, try mixing sugar water in a spoon and let the bee sip it from the edge - it could just be tired.

5 Feed the birds

Birds can experience food shortages at any time of year – you could buy commercial bird feed, but another option is to use mild grated cheese, fat from unsalted meat cuts, cooked potatoes and sunflower seeds. Peanuts could present a choking risk, so only leave them out if you have a suitable mess feeder.

6 Have water

Having a pond in your garden helps to attract frogs and newts, along with water plants. Build in a sloping side, to help animals to get in and out.

7 Use your butt

You can use a butt to collect rain for your plants and lawns. Cats will generally prefer to drink rainwater as opposed to tap water.

Tips courtesy of GardenBuildingsDirect.co.uk 





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