A look at the Chalkhill Blue

A look at the Chalkhill Blue


Posted 3rd Jul 2018


The Chalkhill Blue is, perhaps unsurprisingly, found on sunny, chalk grassland sites in southern England

Clouds of the beautiful blue butterfly can be seen fluttering around low-growing flowers between July and September.

The blue males are most conspicuous as they will fly around searching for more secretive, brown females, and will sometimes be spotted fluttering over flowers in huge numbers, or even congregating on animal dung.

The larval flood plant is Horseshoe Vetch while adults often feed on knapweeds and scabiouses.

With the exception of the incredible rare Large Blue, the Chalkhill Blue is our largest butterfly. Males will be silvery-blue with a dark brown border and a white fringe on the wings, while the females are brown with a white fringe to the wings and a blue dusting near the body. Like Common Blue females, they are larger and have chequered wing fringes. The orange wing spots are less oblivious than in the female Chalkhill Blue.

The Chalkhill Blue's caterpillars are always found with ants, which protect the caterpillars in return for a sugary substance they produce.

Text and information courtesy of The Wildlife Trusts / image courtesy of Margaret Holland





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