Take in the wonders of the UK with a roadtrip

Take in the wonders of the UK with a roadtrip


Posted 28th Jun 2018


With rising train prices, above average temperatures and recent economic uncertainty, staycations are becoming an increasingly popular option

There are lots of beauty spots to take in across the UK, from the beauty of Snowdonia, to the wilds of the Scottish Highlands, the beaches of Cornwall and the vast moors of the Yorkshire Dales.

In fact, there's so much choice, it can be hard to know where to choose. To help you, Camptoo has compiled a list of the best summer driving routes - get ready for a road trip! (You can also find a full breakdown of each day here).

Land's End, Cornwall to John O'Groats, Scotland

For the more adventurous travellers, this road trip takes in the full length of Britain - all 1,055 miles of it. Starting at Britain's most south-westerly point, Land's End in Cornwall, and ending at the most northerly point, John O'Groats in Inverness, it's not a trip for the faint hearted.

You'll take in Exeter, Stonehenge, Oxford, the Peak District, the Lake District, Galloway Forest Park in Glasgow, Inverness and more on the trip which can be done in a week but is recommended to take 10 days to give adequate rest time.

Scottish Highlands

The Scottish Highlands provide a plethora of culture, architecture and history, with unparalleled scenery unlike anywhere else in the world. The islands and coastline are perfect to explore, from the majestic mountains, to the more mysterious lochs. The Highlands boast Britain's largest National Park, Cairngorms and Ben Nevis, its highest peak.

The popular Highland Tourist Route between Aberdeen to Inverness (116 miles), via Cairngorms National Park, includes four historic castles and Culloden Battlefield. Alternatively, Scotland's Route 66, the North Coast 500, is 500 miles of stunning scenery along the North Highlands, including ancient castles, caves and sandy beaches.

Wild Wales

Why not get a taste of the Welsh countryside? Starting from Snowdonia in north Wales, you will be greeted with 827 miles of unspoilt scenery filled with heather-capped mountains, sheep-dotted meadows and wooded valleys. Heading south along the 180-mile stretch of the Ceredigon coast, you will see award-winning beaches and iconic harbours, framed by the Cambrian Mountains.

You will also get to stop off at Cardigan Bay, home to schools of Bottlenose dolphins, and River Teifi, one of the longest rivers for fly-fishing, rafting and walking in Wales.

You will then be able to head to the Brecon Beacons to soak up stunning cliffs and coves of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, taking in the route from St Davids through to Rhodiad-y-Brenind, before visiting the seaside villages of Abereiddy Bay and Porthgain. Abercastle is also worth visiting, thanks to its working harbour and 5,000-year-old Neolithic burial chamber.

Peak District & Yorkshire Dales National Parks

Visit the gateway to the Peak District National Park - Buxton in Derbyshire. Famed for its stepping stones and limestone valleys, you can enjoy cycling, walking and wildlife watching, journeying up to the park's highest point, Kinder Scout, which provides breath-taking views of the valleys. Edale marks one end of the iconic Pennine Way footpath, a 268 mile walk of rugged landscape steeped in history. You can choose to walk as little or as much as you want.

Travelling on to the Yorkshire Dales only takes 1.5hrs via Manchester or Sheffield and Leeds, and encompasses thousands of square miles of moors, valleys, hills and villages. The Bolton Abbey Estate sits on the banks of the River Wharfe, and including the ruins of a 12th century monastery while Malham Village has a towering cliff, and a footpath to Gordale Scar, a limestone ravine with waterfalls.

Exploring the Cotswolds

Just a few hours from London are the Cotswolds, straddling Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire. Characterised by honey-coloured cottages, secluded villages and winding, cobbled streets, you can start in the small market town of Chipping Campden with its mellow limestone terraces and boutique shops and eateries, journeying south to the villages of Willersey and Broadway for cosy country walks and pubs. There's a chance to stop off at rural village Bourton-on-the-Water, where you can see the characteristic low bridges and traditionally made stone houses and Bibury, described as 'the most beautiful village in the Cotswolds' by William Morris.

You can finish up in Stroud, a bustling market town which brims with independent shops, cafes, galleries and a Farmer's market - alternatively, continue to Bath, a town famed for having natural hot springs and 18th-century Georgian architecture. Highlights include Bath Abbey and a Roman-era bath house.

Information courtesy of Camptoo





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