Site of the follow-up to the Battle of Hastings discovered

Site of the follow-up to the Battle of Hastings discovered


Posted 24th Feb 2016


The decisive battlefield of the follow-up to the Battle of Hastings is believed to have been discovered, in what has been described as "a significant contribution to the history of medieval Britain" by Dr Benjamin Hudson from Pennsylvania State University in the US

While the 1066 Battle of Hastings is one of the most famous fights in Britain's history, less was known about the follow-up battle, which is believed to have occurred in a field between Appledore and Northam in 1069, in what has been described by best-selling author Nick Arnold as a "significant" part of British history.

The battle saw the sons of King Harold - defeated at Hastings - come for a rematch in North Devon, which led to 3,000 dying following the arrival of 64 longships which were bristling with armed men. Their forces were routed by Brian of Brittany in a day-long showdown.

Arnold was able to narrow down the potential sites by using a series of scientific techniques, telling the BBC: "By combining scientific data on the estuary with accounts of the battle it's possible to locate the fighting in a small area."

Image courtesy of Getty / Hulton Archive / Culture Club





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