Discover Cornwall’s hidden gems

Discover Cornwall’s hidden gems


Posted 25th Aug 2015


The ever popular and idyllic Cornish landscape and coastline has long been attracting visitors from far and wide. Year on year tourists return to the South West English coast, while others reminisce fondly about their favourite haunts from family holidays. But how well do visitors really know Cornwall?

Graham Tinnion, the concierge at The Cornwall Hotel and Spa, in St Austell, has shared his inside knowledge on some hidden Cornish delights for visitors young and old.

Take the King Harry Ferry to the National Trust’s Trelissick garden and gallery

'This is one of the most beautiful parts of not only Cornwall, but the country,' Graham exclaims. 'The gardens stretch out along the peninsula and there are many places to walk and explore a variety of fantastic flora and fauna.' The estate, which covers 300 acres, and also has a café, gallery, a second-hand book shop, gift shop and six National Trust cottages.

Go crabbing in Readymoney Beach, Fowey

'A holiday to Cornwall would not be complete without some crabbing,' continues Graham. 'One of my favourite places to go is Readymoney Beach, in Fowey. You can pick up crab lines, buckets and bait there and visit any of a number of good spots to catch some crabs. These include the Town Quay, Albert Quay, the Quay in Polruan, the riverfront at Caffa Mill and the slipway on Passage Street. But don’t forget to return the crabs when you’re done.'

Visit Cornwall’s most famous smugglers inn, Jamaica Inn

High up on Bodmin Moor is Jamaica Inn, made famous in the novel by Daphne du Maurier. Built in 1750, the coaching inn was often frequented by smugglers, who used it as a place to hide their ill-gotten gains. Graham explains: 'Jamaica Inn may be quite well known but it’s still a place worth visiting. I recommend dining there. But you can also go along for a ghost hunt.'

Go sea kayaking from Polkerris beach

The area is the perfect spot for sea kayaking with rocky cliffs and sandy coves between the beaches of Polkerris and Par. 'Anyone can give it a try,' says Graham. 'It can be hard work but the views along the stunning Cornish coastline are not to be missed.'

Enjoy one of the walks around Cardinham or Respryn Woods

Ramblers are well catered for on the list of Cornish delights with Graham suggesting Cardinham Woods and Respryn Woods as fantastic places to take a stroll. 'Carndinham Woods has waymarked trails taking you deep into the woods and children can enjoy the Gruffalo’s child trail,' he says. 'On the Lanhydrock estate, near Bodmin is Respryn Woods, where there is a circular walk through semi-natural ancient woodland.'

Stop by and enjoy a stroll and a stay at The Cornwall Hotel and Clearing Spa

'We at The Cornwall also have our own story,' ends Graham. 'The history of the site dates back to the Anglo Saxon period when, during a raid by overseas invaders, a hoard of gold and religious icons was hidden in the grounds. It has since been found but there is plenty left to explore.'

 





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